Gastroenterologists Missouri City TX

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PRASUN K JALAL
(713) 798-5700
Baylor Clinic, 6620 Main Street, Suite 1475
Houston, TX
Business
BAYLOR LIVER CENTER
Specialties
Gastroenterology, GASTROENTEROLOGY INTERNAL MEDICINE LIVER TRANSPLANTATION
Insurance
Insurance Plans Accepted: First Health PPO Multiplan PPO Aetna HMO Great West PPO Aetna Choice PPO BCBS Blue Card PPO Humana ChoiceCare Network PPO UHC Choice Plus POS UHC Options PPO
Medicare Accepted: Yes

Additional Information
Member Organizations: AASLD AGA ACG EASL ASGE


Data Provided By:
Steven Howard Stein, MD
(281) 499-0942
5819 Highway 6 Ste 350
Missouri City, TX
Specialties
Gastroenterology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: New York Med Coll, Valhalla Ny 10595
Graduation Year: 1980

Data Provided By:
Leka Gajula, MD
(832) 667-7355
16651 Southwest Fwy Ste 370
Sugar Land, TX
Specialties
Gastroenterology, Internal Medicine
Gender
Female
Education
Medical School: University Of Illinois/bangalore Medical School
Graduation Year: 1990

Data Provided By:
Douglas Graham Adler, MD
(713) 500-6677
4902 Canterbury Ln
Sugar Land, TX
Specialties
Gastroenterology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Cornell Univ Med Coll, New York Ny 10021
Graduation Year: 1995

Data Provided By:
Fernando Antonio Salazar, MD
(979) 532-1700
8110 Summer Wind Ct
Sugar Land, TX
Specialties
Gastroenterology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Auto De Guadalajara, Fac De Med, Guadalajara, Jalisco, Mexico
Graduation Year: 1993

Data Provided By:
Robert Scott Bresalier, MD
(313) 876-9452
15 Sullivans Lndg
Missouri City, TX
Specialties
Gastroenterology, Internal Medicine
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Chicago, Pritzker Sch Of Med, Chicago Il 60637
Graduation Year: 1978
Hospital
Hospital: Univ Of Tex Md Anderson Cancer, Houston, Tx
Group Practice: Henry Ford Medical Group; Md Anderson Cancer Ctr

Data Provided By:
Stanley Howard Stein
(281) 762-6300
17510 West Grand Parkway South
Sugar Land, TX
Specialty
Gastroenterology

Data Provided By:
Nasrullah Manji
(281) 491-9387
4760 Sweetwater Blvd
Sugar Land, TX
Specialty
Gastroenterology

Data Provided By:
Mukesh Vasantlal Shah, MD
(281) 565-5399
Sugar Land, TX
Specialties
Gastroenterology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Grant Med Coll, Univ Of Bombay, Bombay, Maharashtra, India
Graduation Year: 1974

Data Provided By:
Marc L Kudisch
(713) 777-9995
7777 Southwest Freeway
Houston, TX
Specialty
Gastroenterology, Internal Medicine

Data Provided By:
Data Provided By:

How Healing the Leaky Gut Could Heal Your Life

by Lissa Rankin, OB/GYN

What do your intestines have to do with mojo? EVERYTHING! Sure, you can be vital , even if you’re ill. But if you have leaky gut syndrome, it might manifest in ways you would never expect, such as depression, chronic fatigue syndrome, food allergies, gas and bloating, or the inability to find relief from other diseases, even when adequately treated.

What is leaky gut syndrome?

Good question. I’m a doctor and I never heard about it at Duke or Northwestern, where I trained. While conventional medicine doesn’t recognize the existence of “leaky gut” syndrome, many naturopathic and integrative medicine doctors believe that a “leaky gut” can impair the natural healing process of the body and impede both traditional and alternative treatments.

In theory, leaky gut syndrome results from damage to the intestinal lining that leads to a state of intestinal hyperpermeability, allowing undigested proteins, fats, waste, bacteria, and other toxins to “leak” through the gut membrane, which should only allow healthy nutrients through. These particles can then wind up in the blood stream and lymphatic system, where the immune system tries to come to the rescue to eliminate these unwanted intruders, triggering an auto-immune response. While a natural immune response is usually a good thing, too much can lead to a state of inflammation, which wreaks havoc in ways you may never relate to gastrointestinal function. A normal intestinal lining brilliantly lets good stuff through, while screening bad stuff out, allowing it to be excreted as waste. But when this membrane is impaired, beware!

What kinds of symptoms might result from leaky gut?

Common early symptoms include gas, bloating, and fatigue, which should not be considered normal. These harbingers of other stuff brewing may be your only clue that your intestines need to be healed. If time goes by, you may wind up with chronic fatigue, skin rashes like eczema, psoriasis, or even chronic vulvar itching, food allergies, gluten intolerance, memory problems, mood disorders, body aches and joint pains, and other vague, seemingly unrelated conditions.

Why has my doctor never heard of this?

Nobody ever taught me about leaky gut syndrome in medical school, and unless you’re out there researching and self-educating yourself about complementary and alternative medicine treatments, you would never hear about it. Why is that? We Western docs are research fanatics, and the trust of the matter is that most of the expensive research that fuels modern medicine is sponsored by drug companies hoping to prove that their product works. Once they’ve proved it in randomized controlled trials, it becomes mainstream. Because there is no “drug” to treat leaky gut syndrome and nobody has paid to perform big studies, we just don’t have a lot of data out there in the mainstream medical literature, so it falls largely into the realm of what traditional docs call “anecdotal medicine” (and d...

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